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Posts Tagged ‘fundraising primate conservation’

Check out the newest page on the Wildlife Aid Education website – Animal Chatter:

click here

animal chat

It’s full of interesting animal facts from our regular contributors (myself included!) and opportunities for you to be a guest contributor too!

So find out the difference between couscous and cuscus and learn all about the tiny Indonesian tarsier. Look out  for badger fur and learn how to identify it. Ever wanted to know how to draw animals? There’s loads on there and it’s being added to all the time!

Check it out :)

 

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Gosh time flies doesn’t it!

So as you probably noticed this blog just tailed off in to nowhere last summer! Well don’t worry – I did make it out to the monkeys and I made it back too! Unfortunately I wasn’t able to update the blog from the field site though as the signal just wasn’t strong enough. I had so much I wanted to tell you all and thought I’d write all about it when I got back but… well.. suddenly it’s May and I haven’t! Oh dear! :)

But some exciting things have been happening. I’m delighted to be involved with the fantastic new project – Wildlife Aid Education. It’s a completely free, easy-to-access, curriculum-based teaching and learning resource for teachers, parents and children, provided by The Wildlife Aid Foundation. Check it out here and watch this space for more info in the not too distant future!

wafed

 

I also had the pleasure about a month ago of being asked to visit a local primary school and talk about my work with the monkeys. I was asked by one of the mum’s  to come and speak to the year 6 classes, as they were in the midst of a project all about Rainforests. She thought some first hand tales of the rainforest might inspire them. I jumped at the chance!

So just before the end of last term I headed down with my laptop in tow and talked to a load of  ten – eleven year olds all about what I do.

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I had such fun and the children were amazing. So well behaved, articulate, enthusiastic and interested. They patiently listened to my tales of monkeys and forests, and gruesome details about the spiky plants, painful insect bites and  toilet and shower facilities out there (or lack of!!) .

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They came up with some brilliant questions – including the obvious ones about what the most DANGEROUS animal I’d come in to contact in the forest was! :) But also some really insightful questions and comments about conservation and wildlife.  It’s thoroughly restored my faith in the younger generation.

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I talked to them about how I got in to this wildlife malarkey and how they can start doing things locally if that is what they are interested in.  A few of them came up to me afterwards and said they wanted to work in conservation and wildlife so I hope I was able to inspire them. They wrote a very sweet overview of the session in their newsletter too.

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I’m looking forward  to doing more of this – it’s so lovely to talk about what I do to such an interested and enthusiastic audience. So watch this space!

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What do these:

and these have in common?

Well that is what my students found out today!

It’s getting towards the end of semester. Exams are coming up, coursework’s been handed in and people are knackered! My students had an in -class exam today, followed by a lecture so I thought for the group-work bit of the class I’d do something a little more fun.

The tragedy of the commons is a key bit of theory my students need to know, but it can be a little bit dry and the original paper is one you really have to wade through. In summary what it  is basically talking about is situations where you have a resource (e.g. a lake full of fish) that people have access to. One researcher, Hardin proposed in 1968 that in such situations people will always use the resource for short term gains, NOT long term sustainability. By this I mean they will take as many fish as they can now, rather than leaving some in the lake to reproduce for next year. He proposed that users of these types of “open access resources” (i.e. resources anyone can access), tend not to establish rules about how to use the resource and as such it will end up being depleted – this is the tragedy of the commons.

In contrast another group of researchers, Ostrom et al, in 1999, proposed that in situations like this the resource is never truly open access and that in fact there will be rules and regulations about who can use the resource and how. It recognises that one person’s actions will impact on other people’s. So in the lake example – you might have  a village of fishermen and it may be that only the older men are permitted to fish, and only in certain months. These resources are in effect communally owned which is why the rules exist.

So in order to get my students thinking about this, and to have some fun, we did a little bit of group work. They were divided into groups of 4 or 5. Each group represents a village of fishermen. Each village has a lake within which are enough fish for 4 per person (or smarties in this case!). If they go fishing and catch only 1 fish their family will starve. If they catch 2 their family will have enough food to survive until next year. I however they take 3 or 4 fish they can sell the surplus for money.

In the first round no one is allowed to communicate, so each “fisherman or woman” is acting indepently. The fishing season opens and in year one they are allowed to take 0 – 4 fish – it’s up to them how many they choose.

At the end of the first year of fishing we see how many fish (smarties!) are left in the lake. The fish then reproduce – so if there were 4 left they each reproduce resulting in 8 (hence the big bag of smarties!). Then the second year of fishing begins and once again they can take as many fish as they want to (up to 4).

This continues year by year until there are no fish in the lake.

Now the first time around, remember no one is allowed to talk to each other, so they’re all acting for themselves. What they very quickly find out is that the fish run out! In today’s example  – one group only had 2 years fishing before the lake was left with no fish, the other groups only got 3 years. Meanwhile some fishermen had starved and others had grown fat on the profit of excess fish sales. This is an example of the tragedy of the commons – people tend to act more selfishly which results in not only depletion of the resource but also social inequalities.

So in the next round they are now allowed to communicate and decide as a community how they want to operate the fishing and what people will be allowed to take. So the fishing starts again – back at year 1, but this time it takes a bit longer as everyone discusses how many fish to take….

After year 1 the fish reproduce again and we move to year 2 etc. Interestingly this time around everyone takes only 2 fish. So no one starves, and no one benefits from extra money from selling fish. As a result they can continue to fish well into year 5, 6, 7, etc (until I run out of smarties!) because the lake is now sustainable. They are taking enough fish to feed themselves but not so much that the populations is depleted. And of course there are no social inequalities – everyone is getting the same.

So as a result all the villages keep on fishing, every year – well until the very last year.. when they know it’s the end and all dive in for the smarties!

So this demonstrates Ostrom et al’s idea of common property resources. Everyone has access to the resource but they all have a stake in wanting that resource to be maintained. They’ve all seen the consequences of acting selfishly (they all starved after 3 years), so rules come in to play – only 2 fish can be taken by each person.

Now this was a bit of fun for the students, a chance to have a bit of a less intense class (and have some chocolate) but it does very nicely demonstrate the principles of these theories. So what? Well let’s have a think about this and how it might impact on us – the most obvious example that springs to mind is the North Sea Fisheries. There we have a potential open access resource which, aside from close to national coastlines, is basically a big free for all. One country takes all it can of one species, whilst others try to get more for their own country etc and what do we end up with? Massively depleted fish stocks. Now of course in national waters there are quotas and rules introduced (just like in round 2 of the exercise) which help to control fish stocks and try to maintain them…

This can be applied to a whole variety of conservation scenarios (and economic ones) and is a really important thing to consider when trying to manage resources and local people. The assumption that people will act altruistically when given the chance is generally wrong – most people tend to go for looking after themselves and their family in the here and now.

Anyway – something to think about and the students certainly seemed to enjoy it!

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The Grand Raffle Draw took place Thursday morning at the Pavilion cafe. Tickets were drawn by the Pavilion’s manager Christine Hamilton in front of a packed crowd (well ok, not exactly packed but there were a few people there – thank you Niky, Anshu, Natacha and Preeya ;) ).

 

The winners are:

1. Ipod Shuffle – orange ticket 45 Emma Barry
2. Cricket bat signed by Cricketer Ian Bell – orange ticket John McElroy
3. Head, Back and Shoulder Massage from Tranquil Harmony – green ticket 133 Helen Jayne
4. 10 Handmade fairtrade chocolate lollies from cloud cocoland – orange ticket 188 Louise Hill
5. £25 National Garden voucher – green ticket 313 Sue Lund
6. £40 Waterstones Voucher – green ticket 103Karen Woolton
7. £10 Body Shop – green ticket 209 Debs Wallis
8. Bottle of Veuve Cliquot Champagne – green ticket 293 Stella Barham
9. 2 week free membership of the Pavilion Club – green ticket 72 Robyn Palmer
10. Bottle of Moet Champagne – orange ticket 190 Jo Sykes

Thank you so much to everyone who bought tickets, to the Pavilion for all their support and to Sara Smith from Tranquil Harmony and Trish Hawkins from Cloud Cocoland for the prize donations. Finally, congratulations to the winners. I will arrange with you about how best to get your prizes to you!

I’ll be updating this site with my final fundraising amount in the next few days once I’ve counted it all up :)

Thank you!
xxx

 

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Buy a raffle ticket and help me save the buton macaque!!

I’m still running the raffle to raise the final bit of funds I need for the project this summer. So if you haven’t already then please buy some raffle tickets and help me save the buton macaque :) The draw will be on 7th June so there’s still time to get some tickets!

You could win one of these amazing prizes!

  • Ipod Shuffle
  • Adidas Cricket Bat signed by England cricketer Ian Bell
  • Head, back and shoulder massage from Sara at Tranquil Harmony (www.tranquilharmony.co.uk)
  • 10 handmade, fairtrade chocolate lollies from cloud cocoland (http://www.cloud-cocoland-chocolate.co.uk/)
  • £25 National Garden voucher
  • £40 Waterstones voucher
  • £10 Bodyshop voucher
  • A bottle of Veuve Clicquot champagne
  • A bottle of Moet champagne
  • 2 week free membership of the Pavilion Club

What your support will achieve:

  • £5 – chilli seeds for 5 farmers to plant.
  • £10 – one local person to work for a day following the macaques in the forest.
  • £30 – buys netting for one farm. This protects the crops without harming monkeys and reduces conflict.
  • £100 – funds a half day workshop in the local school, educating children and their parents about the macaques and how to conserve them.

Raffle tickets are 2 for a £1. You can buy them directly from me or online here

If you buy them online I will email you your numbers or post you the tickets – whatever you like :)

Thanks :)
xx

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Buy a raffle ticket and help me save the buton macaque!!

So those who came to the bake sale already know about this but in case anyone else is interested… I’m running a raffle to raise the final bit of funds I need for the project this summer. So if you haven’t already then please buy some raffle tickets and help me save the buton macaque :)

You could win one of these amazing prizes!

  • Ipod Shuffle
  • Adidas Cricket Bat signed by England cricketer Ian Bell
  • Head, back and shoulder massage from Sara at Tranquil Harmony (www.tranquilharmony.co.uk)
  • 10 handmade, fairtrade chocolate lollies from cloud cocoland (http://www.cloud-cocoland-chocolate.co.uk/)
  • £25 National Garden voucher
  • £40 Waterstones voucher
  • £10 Bodyshop voucher
  • A bottle of Veuve Clicquot champagne
  • A bottle of Moet champagne
  • 2 week free membership of the Pavilion Club

What your support will achieve:

  • £5 – chilli seeds for 5 farmers to plant.
  • £10 – one local person to work for a day following the macaques in the forest.
  • £30 – buys netting for one farm. This protects the crops without harming monkeys and reduces conflict.
  • £100 – funds a half day workshop in the local school, educating children and their parents about the macaques and how to conserve them.

Raffle tickets are 2 for a £1. You can buy them directly from me or online here

If you buy them online I will email you your numbers or post you the tickets – whatever you like :)

The raffle will be drawn in a couple of weeks time at the Pavilion Club (watch this space for details).

Thanks :)
xx

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The bake sale I held on 26th April went really well – I sold about 95% of the cakes I had there. The total so far for the bake sale and raffle tickets I sold on the day is about £550!!  This is incredible and I just can’t believe it! I expected to maybe raise a few hundred but not this – just amazing, thank you! You guys clearly like cakes ! ;)

Thank you SO much to everyone who came down to support me and an extra big thank you to my mum, Ann Priston, my Nan, and my lovely friends Anshu Mehta, Niky Riley, Tina Little, Colette Pienaar, Zena Deane, Melanie Hammond (and her two wonderful daughters Jasmine and Layla), Anna Stringer, Tracy Hansford, Preeya and Hilary Keale for the amazing baked donations – I really couldn’t have done it without you all and I am so grateful! you guys can call in the favours from me for this for a LONG time! :)

Milo the giant monkey toy went down a storm with the kids and the cakes seemed to go down well with everyone :)

thanks mum :)

 

a little monkey, sat on a big monkey (Milo), eating a yummy monkey cake!

 

Tina's monkey biscuit

Tina's monkey cake

Jasmine's cake (aged 9)

Layla's cakes (aged 8)

coffee break!

trained monkey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks again to everyone who came and bought cake and raffle tickets. The raffle tickets are still on sale (2 for a £1, from me or here)

and I’ll be drawing that in May.

You could win one of these amazing prizes!

•Ipod Shuffle
•Adidas Cricket Bat signed by England cricketer Ian Bell
•Head, back and shoulder massage from Sara at Tranquil Harmony (www.tranquilharmony.co.uk)
•10 handmade, fairtrade chocolate lollies from cloud cocoland (http://www.cloud-cocoland-chocolate.co.uk/)
•£25 National Garden voucher
•£40 Waterstones voucher
•£10 Bodyshop voucher
•A bottle of Veuve Clicquot champagne
•A bottle of Moet champagne
•2 week free membership of the Pavilion Club

Thanks to the Pavilion, Cloud Cocoland and Sara Smith for donations for the raffle :)

One final thank you again to the Richard and the Pavilion club for letting me do this bake sale and a particular thanks to Christine who helped get this arranged for me. Given that I was competing with their own cafe this was extremely kind of them so big thanks :)

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU (and the monkeys thank you too :) )

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